Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Second-Hand Clothing Encounters in Zambia: Global Discourses, Western Commodities, and Local Histories

Karen Tranberg Hansen
Africa: Journal of the International African Institute
Vol. 69, No. 3 (1999), pp. 343-365
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1161212
Page Count: 23
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Second-Hand Clothing Encounters in Zambia: Global Discourses, Western Commodities, and Local Histories
Preview not available

Abstract

The rapid expansion in commercial exports of second-hand clothing from the West to the Third World and the increase in second-hand clothing consumption in many African countries raise challenging questions about the effects of globalisation and the meanings of the West and the local that consumers attribute to objects at different points of their journey across global space. This article draws on extensive research into the sourcing of second-hand clothing in the West, and its wholesaling, retailing, distribution and consumption in Zambia. Discussing how people in Zambia are dealing with the West's unwanted clothing, the article argues that a cultural economy is at work in local appropriations of this particular commodity that is opening space for local agency in clothing consumption. Clothing has a powerful hold on people's imagination because the self and society articulate through the dressed body. To provide background for this argument, the article briefly sketches recent trends in the global second-hand clothing trade that place the countries of sub-Saharan Africa as the world's largest importing region. There follows a discussion of Zambians' preoccupation with clothing, both new and second-hand, historically and at the present time. It demonstrates that the meanings consumers in Zambia attribute to second-hand clothing are neither uniform nor static but shift across class and gender lines, and between urban and rural areas. Above all, they depend on the cultural politics of their time. In dealing with clothing, people in Zambia are making sense of post-colonial society and their own place within it and in the world at large./Le développement rapide des exportations de vêtements d'occasion de l'Occident vers les pays du Tiers-Monde et la hausse de la consommation de vêtements d'occasion dans les pays africains soulèvent des questions pertinentes sur les effets de la mondialisation et les significations de l'Occident et du local que les consommateurs attribuent aux objets à différents points de leur parcours dans l'espace mondial. Cet article s'appuie sur des travaux de recherche approfondis sur la provenance des vêtements d'occasion en Occident ainsi que sur leur commerce en gros et au détail, leur distribution et leur consommation en Zambie. Analysant l'attitude de la population zambienne à l'égard des vêtements dont l'Occident ne veut plus, cet article suggère qu'une économie culturelle intervient dans les appropriations locales de cette marchandise particulière qui ouvre un espace au commerce local de vêtements. Les vêtements influent beaucoup sur l'imaginaire car le moi et la société s'expriment à travers le corps vêtu. En toile de fond, l'article dresse brièvement un profil des récentes tendances du commerce mondial des vêtements d'occasion qui placent les pays africains sub-sahariens en tête des régions importatrices au niveau mondial. Il s'ensuit une analyse des préoccupations de la population zambienne concernant les vêtements neufs et les vêtements d'occasion, tant sur le plan historique que sur le plan actuel. Cette analyse démontre que les significations qu' attribuent les consommateurs zambiens aux vêtements d'occasion ne sont ni uniformes ni statiques mais qu'elles varient selon la classe sociale et le sexe, et entre les zones urbaines et rurales. Surtout, elles dépendent de la politique culturelle du moment. A travers les vêtements, les Zambiens donnent un sens à la société postcoloniale, à leur place dans cette société et dans le monde en général.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[343]
    [343]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
344
    344
  • Thumbnail: Page 
345
    345
  • Thumbnail: Page 
346
    346
  • Thumbnail: Page 
347
    347
  • Thumbnail: Page 
348
    348
  • Thumbnail: Page 
349
    349
  • Thumbnail: Page 
350
    350
  • Thumbnail: Page 
351
    351
  • Thumbnail: Page 
352
    352
  • Thumbnail: Page 
353
    353
  • Thumbnail: Page 
354
    354
  • Thumbnail: Page 
355
    355
  • Thumbnail: Page 
356
    356
  • Thumbnail: Page 
357
    357
  • Thumbnail: Page 
358
    358
  • Thumbnail: Page 
359
    359
  • Thumbnail: Page 
360
    360
  • Thumbnail: Page 
361
    361
  • Thumbnail: Page 
362
    362
  • Thumbnail: Page 
363
    363
  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364
  • Thumbnail: Page 
365
    365