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Retroactive Inhibition of Meaningfully-Learned Sentences

Richard C. Anderson and John F. Carter
American Educational Research Journal
Vol. 9, No. 3 (Summer, 1972), pp. 443-448
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1161760
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Retroactive Inhibition of Meaningfully-Learned Sentences
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Abstract

Five groups of 15 Ss learned two lists of sentences in a retroactive inhibition paradigm. The first list was the same for all groups while the second was either verbatim, except for the subject noun which served as the response; a paraphrase, except for the subject noun; a set of new sentences constructed from either the verbs and predicate nouns of the verbatim or paraphrase lists; or, a list of totally new sentences. The groups which learned verbatim, paraphrase or verbatim-rearranged sentences forgot significantly more than the group which learned new sentences. This finding clearly demonstrates that interference theory can account for the forgetting of meaningfully-learned, connected discourse.

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