Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Similarities and Differences in Domain-Specific and Global Self-Evaluations of Learning-Disabled, Behaviorally Disordered, and Normally Achieving Adolescents

Susan Harter, Nancy R. Whitesell and Loretta J. Junkin
American Educational Research Journal
Vol. 35, No. 4 (Winter, 1998), pp. 653-680
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1163462
Page Count: 28
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($29.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Similarities and Differences in Domain-Specific and Global Self-Evaluations of Learning-Disabled, Behaviorally Disordered, and Normally Achieving Adolescents
Preview not available

Abstract

Similarities and differences in the domain-specific and global self-evaluations of 235 normally achieving, 118 learning-disabled, and 70 behaviorally disordered adolescents were documented. Factor analysis revealed eight discrete self-concept domains for each group. The importance of success in each domain was similar for each group, as were processes predicting level of self-worth. Consistent with W. James' (1892) formulation, students with high self-worth evaluated themselves positively in domains of importance, whereas students with low self-worth reported much less favorable self-evaluations. Moreover, those with high self-worth were better able to discount areas of weakness than were those with low self-worth. Correlations between specific domains deemed important and self-worth were also very similar across groups. Differences among groups involved the level of scores in that learning-disabled and behaviorally disordered students reported lower cognitive competence and peer likability than did normally achieving students. Behaviorally disordered students also reported more negative perceptions of their conduct. Both special education groups evidenced more negative self-worth with greater discrepancies between importance and negative self-evaluations, particularly in domains salient to the difficulties related to their educational status. Discussion focuses on the examination of group similarities and differences as well as within-group processes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[653]
    [653]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
654
    654
  • Thumbnail: Page 
655
    655
  • Thumbnail: Page 
656
    656
  • Thumbnail: Page 
657
    657
  • Thumbnail: Page 
658
    658
  • Thumbnail: Page 
659
    659
  • Thumbnail: Page 
660
    660
  • Thumbnail: Page 
661
    661
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[662]
    [662]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
663
    663
  • Thumbnail: Page 
664
    664
  • Thumbnail: Page 
665
    665
  • Thumbnail: Page 
666
    666
  • Thumbnail: Page 
667
    667
  • Thumbnail: Page 
668
    668
  • Thumbnail: Page 
669
    669
  • Thumbnail: Page 
670
    670
  • Thumbnail: Page 
671
    671
  • Thumbnail: Page 
672
    672
  • Thumbnail: Page 
673
    673
  • Thumbnail: Page 
674
    674
  • Thumbnail: Page 
675
    675
  • Thumbnail: Page 
676
    676
  • Thumbnail: Page 
677
    677
  • Thumbnail: Page 
678
    678
  • Thumbnail: Page 
679
    679
  • Thumbnail: Page 
680
    680