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Do Domestic Firms Benefit from Direct Foreign Investment? Evidence from Venezuela

Brian J. Aitken and Ann E. Harrison
The American Economic Review
Vol. 89, No. 3 (Jun., 1999), pp. 605-618
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/117035
Page Count: 14
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Do Domestic Firms Benefit from Direct Foreign Investment? Evidence from Venezuela
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Abstract

Governments often promote inward foreign investment to encourage technology "spillovers" from foreign to domestic firms. Using panel data on Venezuelan plants, we find that foreign equity participation is positively correlated with plant productivity (the "own-plant" effect), but this relationship is only robust for small enterprises. We then test for spillovers from joint ventures to plants with no foreign investment. Foreign investment negatively affects the productivity of domestically owned plants. The net impact of foreign investment, taking into account these two offsetting effects, is quite small. The gains from foreign investment appear to be entirely captured by joint ventures.

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