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Reciprocal Teaching: A Review of the Research

Barak Rosenshine and Carla Meister
Review of Educational Research
Vol. 64, No. 4 (Winter, 1994), pp. 479-530
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1170585
Page Count: 52
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Reciprocal Teaching: A Review of the Research
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Abstract

Reciprocal teaching is an instructional procedure designed to teach students cognitive strategies that might lead to improved reading comprehension. The learning of cognitive strategies such as summarization, question generation, clarification, and prediction is supported through dialogue between teacher and students as they attempt to gain meaning from text. This article is a review of sixteen studies on reciprocal teaching, which include published studies found in journal articles and unpublished studies indexed in Dissertation Abstracts International. All the studies included in this review were quantitative in methodology. When standardized tests were used to assess comprehension, the median effect size, favoring reciprocal teaching, was .32. When experimenter-developed comprehension tests were used, the median effect size was .88. We also discuss the role of cognitive strategies in enhancing comprehension, the strategies that were most helpful, instructional approaches for teaching cognitive strategies, the quality of the dialogue during reciprocal teaching, and suggestions for future research and practice.

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