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Statistical Techniques in "AERJ" Articles, 1979-1983: The Preparation of Graduate Students to Read the Educational Research Literature

Laura D. Goodwin and William L. Goodwin
Educational Researcher
Vol. 14, No. 2 (Feb., 1985), pp. 5-11
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1174902
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Statistical Techniques in "AERJ" Articles, 1979-1983: The Preparation of Graduate Students to Read the Educational Research Literature
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Abstract

The statistical techniques used in American Educational Research Journal ("AERJ") research articles between 1979 and 1983 were coded by (a) type of technique, and (b) "major" or "minor" importance for comprehending the research findings. Twenty-seven types of technique were identified and further classified as "basic," "intermediate," or "advanced" level, in terms of typical statistics course progression. Of the "major" techniques, 33%, 37%, and 17% were basic, intermediate, and advanced level, respectively. A review of statistics texts currently in use revealed that basic texts predominate and that the content coverage in both the basic- and intermediate-level texts generally matched well the techniques found in the "AERJ" articles. The findings suggest that students with both a basic- and intermediate-level knowledge of statistics would understand most of the techniques encountered in "AERJ". Other topics addressed included an examination of trends in use of statistical techniques over time, and a comparison of "AERJ" techniques with those used in a sample of Journal of Educational Psychology ("JEP") articles for the same time period.

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