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Can Comprehension Be Taught? A Quantitative Synthesis of "Metacognitive" Studies

Eileen P. Haller, David A. Child and Herbert J. Walberg
Educational Researcher
Vol. 17, No. 9 (Dec., 1988), pp. 5-8
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1175040
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Can Comprehension Be Taught? A Quantitative Synthesis of "Metacognitive" Studies
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Abstract

To assess the effect of "metacognitive" instruction on reading comprehension, 20 studies, with a total student population of 1,553, were compiled and quantitatively synthesized. For 115 effect sizes, or contrasts of experimental and control groups' performance, the mean effect size was .71, which indicates a substantial effect. In this compilation of studies, metacognitive instruction was found particularly effective for junior high students (seventh and eighth grades). Among the metacognitive skills, awareness of textual inconsistency and the use of self-questioning as both a monitoring and a regulating strategy were most effective. Reinforcement was the most effective teaching strategy.

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