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Expert Knowledge and Expert Thinking in Teaching: A Response to Floden and Klinzing

Magdalene Lampert and Christopher M. Clark
Educational Researcher
Vol. 19, No. 5 (Jun. - Jul., 1990), pp. 21-23+42
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1176102
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Expert Knowledge and Expert Thinking in Teaching: A Response to Floden and Klinzing
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Abstract

In their article "What Can Research on Teacher Thinking Contribute to Teacher Preparation? A Second Opinion" (Educational Researcher, June/July, 1990), Floden and Klinzing contend that teacher education would be improved if it were informed by research on practicing teachers's expertise. We do not disagree. However, other questions must be answered if such reforms are to be effective: What is expertise in teaching? How is expertise communicated? Who are the experts? This article attempts to address these questions and further the discussion of expert thinking in teaching.

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