Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Searching for a Theory of Bureaucratic Structure

William F. West
Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory: J-PART
Vol. 7, No. 4 (Oct., 1997), pp. 591-613
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1181661
Page Count: 23
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Cite this Item
Searching for a Theory of Bureaucratic Structure
Preview not available

Abstract

Administrative institutions often have important implications for the allocation of scarce resources. To some extent, therefore, they reflect the interests of those who have a stake in policy implementation. Although scholars have devoted increased attention to this fact, current theories that seek to explain bureaucratic structure as a reflection of politics are severely limited in range. In addition, they provide little insight as to the kinds of interests that underlie specific institutional arrangements. Future research should seek to identify contextual variables that condition institutional choice within the administrative process.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
591
    591
  • Thumbnail: Page 
592
    592
  • Thumbnail: Page 
593
    593
  • Thumbnail: Page 
594
    594
  • Thumbnail: Page 
595
    595
  • Thumbnail: Page 
596
    596
  • Thumbnail: Page 
597
    597
  • Thumbnail: Page 
598
    598
  • Thumbnail: Page 
599
    599
  • Thumbnail: Page 
600
    600
  • Thumbnail: Page 
601
    601
  • Thumbnail: Page 
602
    602
  • Thumbnail: Page 
603
    603
  • Thumbnail: Page 
604
    604
  • Thumbnail: Page 
605
    605
  • Thumbnail: Page 
606
    606
  • Thumbnail: Page 
607
    607
  • Thumbnail: Page 
608
    608
  • Thumbnail: Page 
609
    609
  • Thumbnail: Page 
610
    610
  • Thumbnail: Page 
611
    611
  • Thumbnail: Page 
612
    612
  • Thumbnail: Page 
613
    613