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Teaching Methods in U. S. Undergraduate Economics Courses

William E. Becker and Michael Watts
The Journal of Economic Education
Vol. 32, No. 3, The Scholarship of Teaching Economics (Summer, 2001), pp. 269-279
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
DOI: 10.2307/1183384
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1183384
Page Count: 11
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Teaching Methods in U. S. Undergraduate Economics Courses
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Abstract

In 1995 and 2000, the authors surveyed academic economists in the United States to establish how economics is taught in four types of undergraduate courses. The authors report overall findings from the 2000 survey and compare these results with the aggregate findings for respondents from all types of colleges and universities in the 1995 survey. The basic finding is that, despite some indications of increased emphasis and interest in teaching over this period, the teaching methods in these courses have changed very little over the past five years and are still dominated by "chalk and talk" classroom presentations.

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