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The Present Status of Biosystematics

Tyge W. Böcher
Taxon
Vol. 19, No. 1 (Feb., 1970), pp. 3-5
DOI: 10.2307/1217906
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1217906
Page Count: 3
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The Present Status of Biosystematics
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Abstract

Biosystematics should not develop into a superior synthetic science; it should deliver material for the modern taxonomic synthesis. It should not only continue to produce chromosome numbers, but also to provide taxonomists with information about chromosomal behaviour during meiosis, ecotypical variation, sterility barriers, etc. However, it should not only act as a supporting branch of science, but it should keep its own face, stamped by experimental work. Specialisation in the field of evolution in plants is needed, thereby obtaining a deeper understanding of variation and evolution in relation to the environment. Divergent as well as convergent evolution must be understood just as well as the phenomenon of 'adaptation'.

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