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Provocation of Biosystematics

H. Merxmüller
Taxon
Vol. 19, No. 2 (Apr., 1970), pp. 140-145
DOI: 10.2307/1217944
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1217944
Page Count: 6
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Provocation of Biosystematics
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Abstract

A breach exists between the biosystematists, who deal with evolutionary processes, and the more classical 'conservative' taxonomists, who deal with the endproducts. While dealing with processes, the problem of a generalized species concept (referring in fact to the end products) is hardly relevant to the study of biosystematics. Biosystematics can be successful only when it overcomes the gaps between its approaches "at the cross-roads" to genetics and to systematics; biosystematics can thus become a true integral part of general systematics.

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