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Recurring Polyploid Formation: An Early Account from the Russian Literature

Evgeny V. Mavrodiev and Douglas E. Soltis
Taxon
Vol. 50, No. 2, Golden Jubilee Part 4 (May, 2001), pp. 469-474
DOI: 10.2307/1223892
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1223892
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Recurring Polyploid Formation: An Early Account from the Russian Literature
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Abstract

In just the past decade molecular data have demonstrated that recurrent origins of polyploids appear to be the rule, rather than the exception, with well-documented examples for bryophytes, ferns, and angiosperms. However, Russian investigators seem to have embraced the possibility of recurrent polyploidy at a much earlier date than did other evolutionary biologists. The crossing studies conducted by Maria Rozanova (1934, 1938, 1946) on Rubus should be considered classic investigations of the process of allopolyploidisation. Unfortunately, however, scientists in the West remain unaware of this work because it was largely published in Russian. We review here these remarkable investigations, which revealed at an early date the complexities of polyploidisation. Rozanova demonstrated that the same polyploid species can form multiple times and in multiple ways; she also suggested that the same processes revealed in her crossing studies likely occurred in nature and could account for the morphological diversity observed in natural populations. Thus, although molecular data have recently revealed the high frequency and importance of independent origins of polyploid species, traditional crossing studies conducted in Rubus over 60 years ago actually provided an early suggestion of the possible prevalence of this process, as well as providing critical insights into the mechanisms of polyploidisation.

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