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The Middle-Class American Home of the Fifties: The Use of Architecture in Nicholas Ray's "Bigger than Life" and Douglas Sirk's "All That Heaven Allows"

Roger D. McNiven
Cinema Journal
Vol. 22, No. 4 (Summer, 1983), pp. 38-57
DOI: 10.2307/1224953
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1224953
Page Count: 20
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The Middle-Class American Home of the Fifties: The Use of Architecture in Nicholas Ray's
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Abstract

Two important fifties melodramas characterize the contemporary home in ways typical of the genre of films dealing with the American family. Formal analysis of the films reveals an opposition between conceptual and expressionistic uses of architecture. These contrasting uses of architecture, in turn, affect the way in which the films function as social critiques.

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