Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A Conserved Mechanism of Retrovirus Restriction in Mammals

Greg Towers, Michael Bock, Samia Martin, Yasuhiro Takeuchi, Jonathan P. Stoye and Olivier Danos
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 97, No. 22 (Oct. 24, 2000), pp. 12295-12299
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/123831
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Conserved Mechanism of Retrovirus Restriction in Mammals
Preview not available

Abstract

The murine Fv1 gene restricts infection by N- or B-tropic murine leukemia viruses at a postentry, preintegration stage. The Fv1-sensitive viruses previously used for the study of Fv1 encode an ecotropic envelope gene and thus only infect rodent cells. Consequently, the study of Fv1 restriction has been carried out solely in mice and murine cell lines. By infection with retroviral vectors containing N- or B-tropic core and pantropic vesicular stomatitis virus-G envelope protein, we now demonstrate that cell lines derived from various mammalian species, including humans, have an Fv1-like retrovirus restriction function, preventing N-tropic vector infection. Like Fv1, restriction is directed at amino acid 110 of the viral capsid protein. In contrast to Fv1, the novel restriction is characterized by the absence of reverse-transcribed viral DNA. We speculate that these activities have been selected for by retroviral epidemics in the distant past.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
12295
    12295
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12296
    12296
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12297
    12297
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12298
    12298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12299
    12299