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Fort Toulouse of the Alabamas and the Eighteenth-Century Indian Trade

Donald P. Heldman
World Archaeology
Vol. 5, No. 2, Trade (Oct., 1973), pp. 163-169
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/123985
Page Count: 7
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Fort Toulouse of the Alabamas and the Eighteenth-Century Indian Trade
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Abstract

French colonization of Indian territory in the south-eastern United States during the eighteenth century included the building of both fortresses and trading posts. Fort Toulouse in central Alabama, one of the most important garrisons for the implementation of French policy in the region, was in actuality an early French embassy to the Creek Indian Nation. Archaeological explorations of Fort Toulouse in 1972 and 1973 revealed in kind and quality the items which the French utilized for the Indian trade. In some instances the poor quality of trade goods suggests that French frontiersmen (and perhaps European manufacturers), the middlemen between the Crown and the Creek Indian chiefs, were inadequate choices for the implementation of French foreign policy through trade.

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