Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Market and Fortress in England in the Reign of Offa

Jeremy Haslam
World Archaeology
Vol. 19, No. 1, Urbanization (Jun., 1987), pp. 76-93
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/124500
Page Count: 18
  • Download ($45.00)
  • Cite this Item
Market and Fortress in England in the Reign of Offa
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper puts forward a dual hypothesis of the formation of a system of public fortifications or burhs in Mercian England by King Offa in the later 8th century, with which were associated a series of new 'urban' markets. These defended enclosures, each linked with a defended bridge, formed a systematic defence of the kingdom by preventing penetration up the major rivers by Viking warships. It is argued that the associated markets were a development from the royally created and controlled emporia or wics, and were formed in response to the general increase over Northern Europe of local, regional and international trading in the 8th century. Both burh and market systems can be seen as essential aspects of a wider episode of state formation by King Offa, which parallels developments in Carolingia which are archaeologically and historically rather better evidenced.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[76]
    [76]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93