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Early Historical Urbanization: The Case of the Western Deccan

Himanshu Prabha Ray
World Archaeology
Vol. 19, No. 1, Urbanization (Jun., 1987), pp. 94-104
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/124501
Page Count: 11
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Early Historical Urbanization: The Case of the Western Deccan
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Abstract

In the early centuries of the Christian era, there was an enormous expansion of inland trade networks in the subcontinent, coupled with increased maritime activity between the west coast and the Red Sea ports of the Roman Empire. This led to the rise of urban centres at vantage points along the trade-routes and in the peripheral and hitherto unoccupied areas. An apt example of this is the region of the western Deccan -- an area of isolation which rose to prominence under the Satavahana dynasty primarily on account of its ports and its strategic control of the trade-routes. Another consistent feature is the location of Buddhist monasteries near urban centres, raising the question of the role of ideology in historical change.

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