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Images of War: A Problem in San Rock Art Research

C. Campbell
World Archaeology
Vol. 18, No. 2, Weaponry and Warfare (Oct., 1986), pp. 255-268
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/124619
Page Count: 14
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Images of War: A Problem in San Rock Art Research
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Abstract

Paintings of conflict are not uncommon in the rock art of southern Africa and are distributed over a wide area. A variety of weapons and forms of conflict are portrayed. These paintings can be considered from two viewpoints: either they are realistic depictions of actual events or else they are essentially hallucinatory, portraying the non-real world of trance experience. It is argued that, although the selected paintings are highly detailed, they contain postures and hallucinatory features which indicate that they are intimately associated with medicine men and trance.

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