If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Distinction between Convenience Goods, Shopping Goods, and Specialty Goods

Richard H. Holton
Journal of Marketing
Vol. 23, No. 1 (Jul., 1958), pp. 53-56
DOI: 10.2307/1248017
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1248017
Page Count: 4
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Distinction between Convenience Goods, Shopping Goods, and Specialty Goods
Preview not available

Abstract

The essence of the distinction between convenience goods and shopping goods may lie in the gain resulting from price and quality comparisons relative to the searching costs. For convenience goods this ratio is low, but for shopping goods the probable gain is large enough to call forth more extensive searching. Specialty goods seem to overlap both of the other categories and are distinguished only by the limited size of the market demand for the goods.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56