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Journal Article

Non-Portable Stone Artifacts and Contexts of Meaning: The Tale of Grey Wether (www.museums.ncl.ac.uk/Avebury/stone4.htm)

Mark Gillings and Joshua Pollard
World Archaeology
Vol. 31, No. 2, The Cultural Biography of Objects (Oct., 1999), pp. 179-193
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/125056
Page Count: 15
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Non-Portable Stone Artifacts and Contexts of Meaning: The Tale of Grey Wether (www.museums.ncl.ac.uk/Avebury/stone4.htm)
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Abstract

It is easy to appreciate that portable artefacts can carry lengthy biographies. Those biographies can encapsulate many meanings which will have varied from production, to use, to deposition, with significance changing according to time, place and ownership. However, the cultural biography of static objects, particularly if they are essentially natural rather than culturally modified, may seem more prescribed. It is our contention that this is often far from the case, as the social lives of the stones making up the megalithic settings at Avebury, Wiltshire, vividly demonstrate.

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