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Beyond Survivalism: Regional Folkloristics in Late-Victorian England

John Ashton
Folklore
Vol. 108 (1997), pp. 19-23
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1260703
Page Count: 5
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Beyond Survivalism: Regional Folkloristics in Late-Victorian England
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Abstract

The published record of English folklore emphasises the work of the Folklore Society and its luminaries to the virtual exclusion of all other organisations and individuals. Consequently, it fails to do justice to the contribution of a host of regional collectors, folklorists who were generally also dialectologists and local historians and who toiled the hinterlands independently, for the most part, of the FLS. These men and women corresponded, shared ideas, and developed common approaches independently of the intellectual hierarchy and without a uniform allegiance to its most noted intellectual dogma. If we wish to build a complete picture of our collective scholarly inheritance, it is necessary to reassess the contribution of regional folklore networks and their place in the emerging discipline.

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