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Introduced Plants and Animals in the Galápagos Islands

Robert C. Eckhardt
BioScience
Vol. 22, No. 10 (Oct., 1972), pp. 585-590
DOI: 10.2307/1296204
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1296204
Page Count: 6
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Introduced Plants and Animals in the Galápagos Islands
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Abstract

Island ecosystems are highly susceptible to disturbances caused by introduced organisms. In the Galápagos, exotic plants and animals are an increasing problem. Introduced plants have had a variety of effects. Some plants, such as guava, have been highly destructive. Introduced animals, particularly mammals, have also caused significant changes. Exotic mammals have shown considerable influence on the Galápagos tortoise, native mammals, breeding birds, and others. The foraging of feral herbivores has also had a considerable effect on the abundance and distribution of numerous native plants.

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