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Porifera of the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Shale, from the Wheeler Amphitheater, House Range, in Western Utah

J. Keith Rigby
Journal of Paleontology
Vol. 52, No. 6 (Nov., 1978), pp. 1325-1345
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1303938
Page Count: 21
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Porifera of the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Shale, from the Wheeler Amphitheater, House Range, in Western Utah
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Abstract

Continued collection of trilobites and the associated fauna out of the Elrathia kingii beds of the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Shale, in the Wheeler Amphitheater of the House Range in western Millard County, Utah, has yielded a varied fauna of sponges. Included and described from the collection are Choia carteri Walcott, 1920; Choia utahensis Walcott, 1920; Diagoniella cyathiformis (Dawson & Hinde, 1890) and Chancelloria eros Walcott, 1920. In addition to those forms, the new species, Diagoniella robisoni, Chancelloria pentacta and a large-spiculed Chancelloria sp., are described and figured. Diagoniella cyathiformis is reported from the Wheeler Shale for the first time. Protospongia fenestrata Hicks, listed by Walcott from the Wheeler Shale, could be a fragment of Diagoniella for orientation of the fragment is impossible to determine. Kiwetinokia utahensis Walcott, 1920 occurs as disassociated spicules in the basal part of the formation, well below the Elrathia kingii beds which include the most fossiliferous and productive part of the formation. Chancelloria pentacta is distinguished by a preponderance of spicules with five tangential rays, in addition to the buttonlike, proximal--distal rays. Diagoniella robisoni is a small thin-walled, keg-shaped to goblet-shaped, stalked sponge. It lacks pronounced marginalia and prostalia, other than the basal stalk. These species, plus Sentinelia draco Walcott, 1920 and Hintzespongia bilamina Rigby & Gutschick, 1976 comprise the known sponge fauna of the Wheeler Shale.

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