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The Importance of Traditional Fermented Foods

C. W. Hesseltine and Hwa L. Wang
BioScience
Vol. 30, No. 6, Food from Microbes (Jun., 1980), pp. 402-404
DOI: 10.2307/1308003
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1308003
Page Count: 3
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The Importance of Traditional Fermented Foods
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Abstract

The single-cell protein process is actually old, not new. Traditional fermented foods are made by processes that predate the written historical record and that employ a relatively small number of species of bacteria, yeasts, and molds. With the possible exception of mushrooms, more microorganisms are consumed in these foods than in any other way.

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