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Microwave Radiation Effects on Humans

Stephen F. Cleary
BioScience
Vol. 33, No. 4 (Apr., 1983), pp. 269-273
DOI: 10.2307/1309041
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1309041
Page Count: 5
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Microwave Radiation Effects on Humans
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Abstract

After more than two decades of research, there are still many uncertainties concerning the effects of microwave exposure. Animal experiments have revealed apparent sensitivities at exposure levels below those commonly associated with the only known effect of microwave absorption: tissue heating. The effects fall into three categories: gross thermal damage due to high-intensity exposure, microwave-specific thermal effects at intermediate intensities, and apparently nonthermal effects at low intensities. Whereas the first category of effects are reasonably well understood, the second and third categories are not. Consideration of the unique way microwaves are absorbed in living systems provides some clues for resolving uncertainties in this area.

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