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The Riddle of the Scottish Pig

Eric B. Ross
BioScience
Vol. 33, No. 2 (Feb., 1983), pp. 99-106
DOI: 10.2307/1309171
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1309171
Page Count: 8
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The Riddle of the Scottish Pig
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Abstract

Dietary customs are frequently regarded as evidence of a disposition for human behavior to be dictated by obscure and arbitrary cultural motives. An examination of a putative superstition against pigs in Scotland exemplifies the potential of an evolutionary anthropology to illuminate such customs as constituents of specific human ecological systems, in terms that are generalizable and predictive.

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