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Consequences of Creating New Kingdoms of Organisms

John O. Corliss
BioScience
Vol. 33, No. 5 (May, 1983), pp. 314-318
DOI: 10.2307/1309318
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1309318
Page Count: 5
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Consequences of Creating New Kingdoms of Organisms
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Abstract

Numerous taxonomic-nomenclatural problems arise when more than two kingdoms of eukaryotic organisms are recognized. The current international codes of botanical and zoological nomenclature are inadequate, especially for a kingdom Protista that embraces many groups of species conventionally considered ("mini") plants or animals, but which definitely are not. Should the two codes be modified, united, or replaced by separate ones for every major kingdom proposed and accepted? Another problem discussed is the (unnecessary) proliferation of new names for redefined or reshuffled high-level taxa.

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