Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Do Strange Attractors Govern Ecological Systems?

W. M. Schaffer and M. Kot
BioScience
Vol. 35, No. 6 (Jun., 1985), pp. 342-350
DOI: 10.2307/1309902
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1309902
Page Count: 9
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Do Strange Attractors Govern Ecological Systems?
Preview not available

Abstract

One of the fundamental problems in ecology is understanding the ragged ups and downs in abundance that characterize many natural populations. Recent advances in nonlinear dynamics suggest that even the "noisiest" variation may have its origin in simple deterministic mechanisms. Here we review both the theory and the evidence and conclude that "strange" attractors, the chaotic counterparts to equilibria and limit cycles, may play an important role in ecological systems.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
342
    342
  • Thumbnail: Page 
343
    343
  • Thumbnail: Page 
344
    344
  • Thumbnail: Page 
345
    345
  • Thumbnail: Page 
346
    346
  • Thumbnail: Page 
347
    347
  • Thumbnail: Page 
348
    348
  • Thumbnail: Page 
349
    349
  • Thumbnail: Page 
350
    350