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Grade Inflation or Better Comprehension: Self-Scheduled Instruction in Introductory Sociology

Michael P. Johnson and Edward J. Walsh
Teaching Sociology
Vol. 5, No. 4 (Jul., 1978), pp. 363-376
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1317277
Page Count: 14
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Grade Inflation or Better Comprehension: Self-Scheduled Instruction in Introductory Sociology
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Abstract

Students from three sections of introductory sociology (n = 340) were interviewed 4 to 8 months after completing the course. Results indicated that students in the self-scheduled instruction (SSI) option were more likely than others to have chosen their section because of its teaching method and they reported greater learning than did students in the other sections. Their actual learning, as measured by a 30-item examination, was significantly greater than that in other sections. Controls on grade in the course demonstrate that A students in the SSI section performed as well as A students in the other sections. It is suggested that the mounting evidence of the efficacy of the SSI approach should shift the burden of proof to the defenders of the status quo.

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