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Education for Survival: Using Films to Teach War as a Social Problem

James T. Hannon and Sam Marullo
Teaching Sociology
Vol. 16, No. 3 (Jul., 1988), pp. 245-255
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1317526
Page Count: 11
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Education for Survival: Using Films to Teach War as a Social Problem
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Abstract

War and the high cost of war preparations are two of humanity's greatest social problems, but many sociologists avoid these topics in their introductory courses. Reasons include the lack of professional reward for addressing these topics and for reworking finished courses, a fear of negative feedback, and a reluctance to increase students' anxiety without offering a means of personal empowerment. Structuring the presentation of war and peace topics around films and other audiovisual resources is an effective way of overcoming these barriers. This paper presents several arguments and strategies for the use of films on war and peace in introductory and social problems courses. It also addresses the practical problems of cost, scheduling, and locating appropriate resources. An appendix provides an annotated list of effective films, videos, and slide shows.

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