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Teaching about Influence in Simple Regression

Frederick O. Lorenz
Teaching Sociology
Vol. 15, No. 2, Teaching Research Methods and Statistics (Apr., 1987), pp. 173-177
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1318032
Page Count: 5
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Teaching about Influence in Simple Regression
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Abstract

Most introductory social science statistics courses include an abbreviated discussion of regression assumptions and the problem of outliers. An important idea in residual analysis is that all outliers are not equal; some have greater "influence" than others on the intercept and slope of the prediction equation. An example first proposed by Anscombe (1973) is used and then extended to illustrate how the idea of influence, as developed by Cook (1977; 1979), can be incorporated into introductory lectures on simple regression.

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