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A Further Look at "Common Sense" in Introductory Sociology

James A. Mathisen
Teaching Sociology
Vol. 17, No. 3 (Jul., 1989), pp. 307-315
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1318077
Page Count: 9
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A Further Look at "Common Sense" in Introductory Sociology
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Abstract

"Common sense" has received widespread negative treatment in introductory sociology textbooks. This paper argues three points: 1) negative treatments of common sense lead to greater problems than those which they seek to solve by their challenging of common sense; 2) a variety of bases exists both in sociology and in philosophy in support of common sense; 3) introductory texts could serve students more adequately by a balanced explanation and interpretation of the relationship between common sense and sociology as a science. The paper concludes with an example of what such an explanation should include.

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