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Toward a "Global" Curriculum and Classroom: Contrasting Comparative- and World-Historical Strategies

William G. Martin
Teaching Sociology
Vol. 24, No. 2 (Apr., 1996), pp. 135-147
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1318804
Page Count: 13
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Toward a "Global" Curriculum and Classroom: Contrasting Comparative- and World-Historical Strategies
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Abstract

Over the last decade, calls to "internationalize" the discipline and our classrooms have grown steadily. This essay examines the origins and status of this movement, responses to long-standing "globalization" appeals, and the pedagogical implications of current approaches to "globalization." I argue that the greater use of comparative, interdisciplinary, or even international materials will fail to overcome the parochialism deeply rooted in the discipline. An alternative path forward is developed through a contrast between comparative- and world-historical perspectives, with concrete illustrations drawn from a variety of textbooks and courses.

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