Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Science Fiction and Introductory Sociology: The "Handmaid" in the Classroom

Cheryl Laz
Teaching Sociology
Vol. 24, No. 1 (Jan., 1996), pp. 54-63
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1318898
Page Count: 10
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Science Fiction and Introductory Sociology: The "Handmaid" in the Classroom
Preview not available

Abstract

Although there is a great deal of available material on using nontraditional resources for teaching sociology, the pedagogical uses of science fiction have not been examined for 20 years. This essay first asserts the need for an update based on changes in society and in science fiction over the past two decades. The paper then focuses on the uses of SF to teach sociology and critical thinking by describing how SF can help students to "make strange" (i.e., develop a skeptical, questioning stance), to "make believe" (i.e., develop critical and creative thinking), and to "make real" (i.e., use sociological concepts and theories). As illustration, the essay concludes with a detailed description of the use of Margaret Atwood's "The Handmaid's Tale" in teaching introductory sociology.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63