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Skipping Class: An Analysis of Absenteeism among First-Year College Students

Gary Wyatt
Teaching Sociology
Vol. 20, No. 3 (Jul., 1992), pp. 201-207
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1319061
Page Count: 7
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Skipping Class: An Analysis of Absenteeism among First-Year College Students
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Abstract

This study explored class absenteeism among first-year college students. I analyzed nine variables to assess possible effects on missing class. The results suggested that disliking a class was associated positively with absenteeism from that class. Further analysis confirmed the following: time spent studying was associated negatively with absenteeism from classes that students liked as well as from those they disliked; frequency of alcohol consumption was associated positively with absenteeism from disliked classes but had no effect on liked classes; being female was associated positively with absenteeism from classes liked as well as disliked; finally, the previous semester's grade point average was associated negatively with absenteeism from classes that students disliked but not from those they liked. The implications of these findings are discussed.

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