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The Dichotomous Man: The Message of Phaedrus

Michael S. Youngblood
Studies in Art Education
Vol. 25, No. 1 (1983), pp. 6-13
DOI: 10.2307/1320265
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1320265
Page Count: 8
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The Dichotomous Man: The Message of Phaedrus
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Abstract

Common art talk and recent articles and research in art education promote the idea that artists are motivated primarily by emotion and intuition in the pursuit of their artistic endeavors. Scientific literature, on the other hand, often suggests that scientists are stimulated primarily by logic and reason in their work. This paper examines these two modes of viewing human thinking and performance, the Romantic and the Classic, by reviewing their physiological, psychological, and philosophical foundations. It questions certain classroom procedures advocated in art as a result of this influential dichotomy. Several cautionary notes are set forth for art educators regarding the advisability of reducing artistic or scientific thinking and practice to such a simple division into two parts.

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