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Art and Education for Women in 19th Century Boston

Arthur D. Efland
Studies in Art Education
Vol. 26, No. 3 (Spring, 1985), pp. 133-140
DOI: 10.2307/1320318
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1320318
Page Count: 8
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Art and Education for Women in 19th Century Boston
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Abstract

Art was introduced into women's education as a kind of finishing school treatment to equip them for marriage to middle- and upper-class gentlemen, and later for careers as school teachers. Common school art, and later industrial drawing, emphasized practical application and can be characterized as masculine art education. Feminine art education, by contrast, tended to promote the teaching of art as high culture. Women also tended to regard art as a cultural subject with moral overtones, which accounts for the picture study movement after the industrial drawing movement waned.

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