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Copying and Artistic Behaviors: Children and Comic Strips

Nancy R. Smith
Studies in Art Education
Vol. 26, No. 3 (Spring, 1985), pp. 147-156
DOI: 10.2307/1320320
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1320320
Page Count: 10
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Copying and Artistic Behaviors: Children and Comic Strips
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Abstract

Many educators have a negative view of copying. Some proponents, however, argue that copying is worthwhile because it teaches skills and gives children confidence in their artistic ability. This paper presents a third view. The main thesis is that there are different types of copying, some involving artistic behaviors and some not. It is important to differentiate these types separating the replication of conventions from more inventive artistic behaviors. A framework for such examination is applied in a group of pilot studies focused on comic strips.

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