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Why Do We Teach Art Today? Conceptions of Art Education and Their Justification

Richard Siegesmund
Studies in Art Education
Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring, 1998), pp. 197-214
DOI: 10.2307/1320364
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1320364
Page Count: 18
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Why Do We Teach Art Today? Conceptions of Art Education and Their Justification
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Abstract

Different, and sometimes conflicting, justifications have been advanced for the importance of teaching art in schools. Following the broad historical conceptual frameworks established by Efland (1990) to describe these debates, the paper traces how these frameworks continue to be useful in categorizing contemporary arguments on the form of art education. The paper contends that many current popular justifications for art education lack a solid epistemological rationale. Out of this review, a conceptual framework that approaches art education as a study of reasoned perception is advocated as the soundest epistemological foundation for the field.

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