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Aesthetic Development in Cross-Cultural Contexts: A Study of Art Appreciation in Japan, Taiwan, and the United States

Wenchun Wang and Kazuhiro Ishizaki
Studies in Art Education
Vol. 43, No. 4 (Summer, 2002), pp. 373-391
DOI: 10.2307/1320984
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1320984
Page Count: 19
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Aesthetic Development in Cross-Cultural Contexts: A Study of Art Appreciation in Japan, Taiwan, and the United States
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Abstract

The purpose of this research was to reexamine Parsons's theoretical framework of stage development from a cross-cultural point of view; to clarify the different developmental characteristics in different cultures; and to interpret these differences in light of differences in the contexts of art education in different cultures. An Art Appreciation Profile (AAP) was administered to 884 students ranging from third-graders to college students in Japan, Taiwan, and the United States, and quantitative analyses were conducted. In addition, a qualitative analysis was made based on interviews conducted among 35 Japanese students. As a result, this research was not able to support the universality of Parsons's hypothesis. The developmental change from stage two to three was only verified among cases in Japan but not in the U. S. The reason why Parsons's hypothesis about a developmental sequence from stage two to three was only supported by the cases in Japan seems to be that the emphasis on modernism in Japanese art education is compatible with his theory. In particular, an interest in the cognitive ability associated with the recognition of the elements of art was recognized among the cases in Japan.

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