Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Tariffs and Transport Costs on U.S. Wheat Exports

Won W. Koo
North Central Journal of Agricultural Economics
Vol. 6, No. 2 (Jul., 1984), pp. 99-107
DOI: 10.2307/1349255
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1349255
Page Count: 9
  • Download ($36.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Tariffs and Transport Costs on U.S. Wheat Exports
Preview not available

Abstract

This study reveals that under a free market system, the West Coast ports have the highest price for winter and spring wheat and the Great Lakes have the lowest prices. Price differences between these two ports are about 70 cents per bushel. Wheat prices at the Gulf ports are approximately 35 cents lower than at the West Coast. Durum wheat price is higher at the Great Lakes and Gulf ports than at the West Coast. The geographic price differences depend upon trade restrictions and volatilities in transport costs. Tariffs imposed by the EEC is absorbed more by consumers in the importing countries than by producers in the U.S. In contrast to tariffs, changes in ocean freight rate influence wheat price at U.S. ports more than in importing countries because freight rate changes are absorbed more by producers in U.S. Welfare losses due to tariffs and increases in transport costs are much larger in the U.S. than in the EEC and/or other importing regions.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[99]
    [99]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107