Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Inflationary Finance under Discretion and Rules

Robert J. Barro
The Canadian Journal of Economics / Revue canadienne d'Economique
Vol. 16, No. 1 (Feb., 1983), pp. 1-16
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Canadian Economics Association
DOI: 10.2307/134971
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/134971
Page Count: 16
  • Get Access
  • Download ($5.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Inflationary Finance under Discretion and Rules
Preview not available

Abstract

Inflationary finance involves first, the tax on cash balances from expected inflation and second, a capital levy from unexpected inflation. From the standpoint of minimizing distortions, these capital levies are attractive, ex post, to the policy-maker. In a full equilibrium two conditions hold: (1) the monetary authority optimizes subject to people's expectations mechanisms; and (2) people form expectations rationally, given their knowledge of the policy-maker's objectives. The outcomes under discretionary policy are contrasted with those generated under rules. In a purely discretionary regime the monetary authority can make no meaningful commitments about the future behaviour of money and prices. Under an enforced rule it becomes possible to make some guarantees. Hence, the links between monetary actions and inflationary expectations can be internalized. There is a distinction between fully contingent rules and rules of simple form. A simple rule allows the internalization of some connections between policy actions and inflationary expectations, but discretion permits some desirable flexibility of monetary growth. /// Le financement par l'inflation sous un régime discrétionnaire et sous un régime de règles. Le financement par l'inflation implique d'abord l'impôt sur l'encaisse entrainé par l'inflation anticipée et ensuite l'impôt sur le capital engendré par l'inflation non-anticipée. Pour un architecte de politiques publiques qui veut minimiser les distorsions, ces impôts sur le capital sont séduisants, ex post. En position d'équilibre complet, on observe deux conditions: (1) l'autorité monétaire optimise sous la contrainte des mécanismes d'anticipation de la population, et (2) la population forme rationnellement ses anticipations à partir de sa connaissance des objectifs du définisseur de politiques. On compare les résultats sous un régime de politique monétaire discrétionnaire avec ceux qu'on obtient sous un régime de règles monétaires. Sous un régime parfaitement discrétionnaire, l'autorité monétaire ne peut s'engager d'aucune manière à définir le comportement futur des prix ou de la masse monétaire. Sous un régime de règle imposée, on peut donner de telles garanties, d'où la possibilité d'internaliser les liens entre les actions monétaires et les anticipations d'inflation. On souligne une distinction entre des règles permettant de tenir compte de toutes sortes de contingences et des règles d'une forme simple. Une règle simple permet l'internalisation de certains liens entre les actions politiques et les anticipations d'inflation, mais le régime discrétionnaire donne une certaine `flexibilité' désirable de la croissance monétaire.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[1]
    [1]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16