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Little Tuna, Euthynnus alletteratus, in Northern Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, with an Illustration of Its Skeleton

J. Romeo and Alice J. Mansueti
Chesapeake Science
Vol. 3, No. 4 (Dec., 1962), pp. 257-263
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1350633
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Little Tuna, Euthynnus alletteratus, in Northern Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, with an Illustration of Its Skeleton
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Abstract

Catches of hook-and-line and commercial pound-net fishermen, and sightings of schools, of little tuna in northern Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, are discussed. This species had never been recorded in the estuary before 1951 in Maryland or in Virginia before 1946. Its occurrence in the Bay is irregular, having been recorded only during early summer and in late fall. A small pound-net and haul seine fishery for it has existed in the Virginia part of the Bay for about a decade. The gross topographic osteology of a 15½ pound female little tuna caught in Chesapeake Bay off Kent Island, Maryland, is illustrated for the species for the first time. The unique trelliswork of the ventral vertebral column, one of the most important characters of the family Katsuwonidae, is shown in detail. It is formed from the divided haemapophyses that encloses a long canal to carry the large ventral blood vessel. Several modifications of vertebral terminology as they apply to the trellis are advanced. The entire skeleton in the Maryland specimen and its details are typical of those recorded for the little tuna elsewhere.

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