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Food, Age, Growth, and Morphology of the Blackbanded Sunfish, Enneacanthus c. chaetodon, in Smithville Pond, Maryland

Frank J. Schwartz
Chesapeake Science
Vol. 2, No. 1/2 (Mar. - Jun., 1961), pp. 82-88
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1350725
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Food, Age, Growth, and Morphology of the Blackbanded Sunfish, Enneacanthus c. chaetodon, in Smithville Pond, Maryland
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Abstract

A total of 322 specimens of the blackbanded sunfish Enneacanthus c. chaetodon, was collected during two separate drainings of Smithville Pond, on the Coastal Plain, Caroline County, Maryland. Ninety, 30 from the November 1955 and 60 from the July 1958 samples, were examined to ascertain age, growth, body proportions, food and sexual dimorphism. Body proportions approached those noted for the recently described southern subspecies E. c. elizabethae. No morphological or growth differences were found between males and females in either sample. Lengths of 43-53 mm were attained in about four years. Wide differences occurred, between samples, in the calculated lengths for ages 1 and 2 while those for ages 3 and 4 were more similar. Further investigation will determine whether these data exhibit populations which reflect extremes of growth-environment interplay or an unreliability in the scale method of determining age and growth for this species. Chironomids (summer) and caddis fly larvae (fall) were prominent food items.

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