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Notes on the Biology of the Sea Nettle, Chrysaora quinquecirrha, in Chesapeake Bay

David G. Cargo and Leonard P. Schultz
Chesapeake Science
Vol. 7, No. 2 (Jun., 1966), pp. 95-100
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1351129
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Notes on the Biology of the Sea Nettle, Chrysaora quinquecirrha, in Chesapeake Bay
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Abstract

Despite the continuous nuisance value of the sea nettle in Chesapeake Bay, the only major report on the biology of this species was that of the laboratory studies by Littleford in 1939. Therefore, we began a study of the biology of Chrysaora quinquecirrha aimed at increasing the understanding of its life history which had not been investigated. The occurrence of sessile stages on the under-sides of a variety of substrates, especially oyster shells, is reported for the first time. The geographic range of the polyp stage in Chesapeake Bay is partially delineated with respect to depth (<11 m) and salinity (5‰-19‰). Sampling for ephyrae near Solomons, Maryland suggested that strobilation began in April and extended into August. The growth of medusae was rapid, and their feeding appeared opportunistic and frequent. The response of polyps to unfavorable conditions was to encyst. We also noted the production of pedal cysts during late summer in the absence of any apparent inducement, suggesting an important asexual mode of reproduction. A brief discussion of observed ecological associations of the polyps and medusae with other organisms is included.

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