Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A Ten-Year Study of Meroplankton in North Carolina Estuaries: Annual Occurrence of Some Brachyuran Developmental Stages

Austin B. Williams
Chesapeake Science
Vol. 12, No. 2 (Jun., 1971), pp. 53-61
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1351138
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Ten-Year Study of Meroplankton in North Carolina Estuaries: Annual Occurrence of Some Brachyuran Developmental Stages
Preview not available

Abstract

Seasonal occurrence of brachyuran developmental stages is predictable in meroplankton collected inside the barrier islands of North Carolina near inlets and along longitudinal transects of the larger estuaries. Nets of 1 mm mesh employed in the sampling program limited catches to larger zoeae and megalopae, and of these only a fraction can be identified with precision. Callinectes megalopae were taken in every month of the year and through almost the entire length of the estuary. Evidence indicates that this postlarval stage is active in surface waters at night, contributing substantially to dispersal of the species, probably C. sapidus in this case. Hexapanopeus angustifrons megalopae were limited to the warm season in samples from a single station near Beaufort Inlet. Rhithropanopeus harrisii zoeae and megalopae were distributed abundantly in oligo-mesohaline waters of Neuse and Pamlico Rivers. Showing no nocturnal stratification, the stages were present continuously from June to October. Megalopae of all these species, usually considered benthic in habit, are readily captured in surface waters at night.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61