Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Effects of Simulated Saltwater Intrusions on the Growth and Survival of Wild Celery, Vallisneria americana, from the Caloosahatchee Estuary (South Florida)

Peter H. Doering, Robert H. Chamberlain and J. Michael McMunigal
Estuaries
Vol. 24, No. 6, Part A (Dec., 2001), pp. 894-903
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1353180
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Simulated Saltwater Intrusions on the Growth and Survival of Wild Celery, Vallisneria americana, from the Caloosahatchee Estuary (South Florida)
Preview not available

Abstract

The effects of simulated saltwater intrusions on the growth and survival of the freshwater angiosperm, Vallisneria americana Michx., from the Caloosahatchee estuary (southwest Florida, USA) were examined experimentally using indoor mesocosms. Intrusions were simulated by raising salinity in the mesocosms to 18‰ for varying durations and then returning the salinity to 3‰. In separate experiments, exposures of short duration (1, 5, 11, and 20 d) and long duration (20, 30, 50, and 70 d) were examined. Plants held at a constant 3‰ served as controls. Mortality was proportional to the duration of exposure. Statistically significant (p < 0.05) losses of blades and shoots occurred at exposures of 20 d or longer, although during a 1-mo recovery period at 3‰ viable plants survived the 70-d exposure to 18‰. Expressed as a percentage of initial levels, the extent of recovery after 1 mo was proportional to duration of exposure. V. americana can survive the salinity stress associated with most intrusions of salt water in the upper Caloosahatchee estuary.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
894
    894
  • Thumbnail: Page 
895
    895
  • Thumbnail: Page 
896
    896
  • Thumbnail: Page 
897
    897
  • Thumbnail: Page 
898
    898
  • Thumbnail: Page 
899
    899
  • Thumbnail: Page 
900
    900
  • Thumbnail: Page 
901
    901
  • Thumbnail: Page 
902
    902
  • Thumbnail: Page 
903
    903