Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

New Light on the Early Iron Age at Tell Beit Mirsim

Raphael Greenberg
Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
No. 265 (Feb., 1987), pp. 55-80
DOI: 10.2307/1356807
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1356807
Page Count: 26

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Bowls, Pottery, Cooking pots, Colors, Excavations, Iron age, Silos, Interior design, Bronzes, Bronze age
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
New Light on the Early Iron Age at Tell Beit Mirsim
Preview not available

Abstract

Tell Beit Mirsim was continuously, albeit sparsely, settled during the 13th-11th centuries B. C., and may provide a key to the understanding of this period in the southern Shephelah. Albright, identifying the site with Debir, suggested a Canaanite-Israelite-Philistine sequence for Strata C2-B1-B2. The stratigraphic and ceramic evidence, some of it previously unpublished, is here reexamined. We show that the spatial organization and architecture of the Iron I strata do not resemble those of sites identified as Israelite or Philistine, and that the pottery of these strata is fundamentally in the Canaanite tradition. Within this tradition, an influx of new forms and techniques is observed in Stratum B2. These are closely associated with Lachish Stratum VI, and it is suggested that Tell Beit Mirsim may have served as a haven for bearers of the Lachish pottery-making tradition, after that site was destroyed around 1150 B. C.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80