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Archaeological and Faunal Evidence from Natufian and Timnian Sites in Southern Jordan, with Notes on Pollen Evidence

Donald O. Henry, Priscilla F. Turnbull, Aline Emery-Barbier and Arlette Leroi-Gourhan
Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
No. 257 (Winter, 1985), pp. 45-64
DOI: 10.2307/1356818
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1356818
Page Count: 20
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Archaeological and Faunal Evidence from Natufian and Timnian Sites in Southern Jordan, with Notes on Pollen Evidence
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Abstract

Archaeological excavations in the vicinity of Ras en-Naqb, southern Jordan, produced artifacts and faunal remains of two distinct cultural stages. The early Natufian site of Wâdī Judayid is carbon-dated ca. 12,000 b. p. This site predates the earliest dated coastal site in the Levant. The large number and variety of tools, combined with the large amount of débitage and the faunal remains indicate that the Wâdī Judayid site was a large base camp occupied over considerable periods of time. The second site described is Jebel el-Jill, a Timnian site containing ground stone items, pottery sherds, and worked bone in addition to a large inventory of flint artifacts. Evidence is presented in favor of the argument that southern Jordan enjoyed a more humid climate at the end of the Pleistocene period, before the present arid conditions set in. The earliest known wild sheep bones are reported from the Natufian site.

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